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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
. to start us down the road of making our children safer by treating children's gun safety like their auto safety. all the air bags, anti-drunk driving campaigns, child seats, driver education, careful licensing, it slashed the accident rate but it didn't eliminate them altogether. we can't imagine a world without these protections for our families. let's see if we can imagine a world where our children are safer from gun violence. and then make it happen. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the chair recognizes the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. murphy, for five minutes. mr. murphy: madam speaker, i rise today with a heavy heart, to honor petty officer nicholas , a person who sacrificed his life in the most honorable of ways, to protect and save the life of another human being. his life was a testament to the core values of the united states navy, honor, courage and commitment. on december 9, twelve, pet -- 2012, the petty officer rescued ar kidnapped american doctor from the taliban near kabul. a veteran of the iraq war and a decorated navy seal, the petty officer died durin
not let interest groups persuade us otherwise. we need restrictions and sensible gun control legislation. we need them here and we need them now. our children are counting on us and we really need to not let them down. i yield back. mr. murphy: i yield 1:30 to the gentlelady from california, ms. esh -- eshoo. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. eshoo: i thank the gentlelady from connecticut. there have been many heart -wrenching tributes this evening. on behalf of my constituents in the 14th congressional district in california, i hope that our words and our prayers and also our future actions will be a source of comfort to the parents of the victims and to the community of newtown, connecticut. it is appropriate that we offer our prayers and our sympathy, but that's not enough. that is not enough. it is in this chamber and in this congress we're together. we can indeed make the changes that the american people in their and wish are looking for. i can't help think of the words of you lincoln's gettysburg address when he said the nation will long remember what we sa
and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark of night, to find out what was going on, on the other side of the river, and he and his three companions, i
of us who had the privilege to serve with you. i hope and i pray that god will give you and your wife many, many more years of life and enjoyment because you have certainly earned it, because you have served not only the united states house of representatives, but you have served us, you have served the people of our districts as well as helping us be better members of congress. so with that i will close by asking god to please bless you and your family and may god continue to bless the house of representatives and jay pearson, you will be in our hearts until the day we die. god bless you. . mr. woodall: at this time, it's migrate pleasure to yield the gentleman from california, chairman of the ways and means health subcommittee, mr. herger. mr. herger: i thank my good friend. how wonderful it is to be able to sit here and listen to all these incredibly warm remarks from people who, like myself, know and love jay pearson. and there's a reason for that. jay, you're one of the best of the best. and i think, it's hard to believe that 26 years comes and goes so very, very quickly, but it
-handed pitch, a college baseball player and two of her granddaughters that worked for me as a page, for us as a page, rebecca and holly. when she's not at the desk -- and she spends long hours there -- mr. president, i don't go home early. i could call, she would be there, 9:00, 10:00 at night and that is no exaggeration. but she's not at that desk, janice was usually in georgia or north carolina with her children or grandchildren. now, she has probably been really political but i think she's gotten a little more political working for me. she's made sure each of her grandchildren makes sure they understand the importance of their political voice. during the recent election she called those eligible to vote to make sure they'd voted. and i didn't press very hard but she may have urged them how they should vote. while janice's accomplishments deserve recognition, it is janice herself who will be missed so dearly. she has served not only as a deeply trusted and committed assistant to me, but as a mentor to many who have worked with her. i know i'm not the only one who will note her be absence
into effect. that could take a painful toll on the u.s. economy. let's go to capitol hill. our senior congressional correspondent dana bash is standing by with the latest. dana? >> reporter: well, wolf, the vote that the speaker calls plan b is about an hour away. we're told that republican leaders at this hour are still twisting arms, republican arms to make sure that this passes. there's a weird sense here, a weird atmosphere that things are moving fast but stalled at the same time. the fiscal cliff impasse is so surreal, democrats are resorting to movie analogies, calling republicans thelma and louise. >> rather than face the reality of what lies ahead, they hit the gas. that's what we're hearing from speaker boehner now. >> reporter: don't blame us, say the republicans, it's the president. >> he's doing everything within his power to take us over the cliff and he is set on dividing us. >> reporter: adding to the sense that congress is in an alternate universe, instead of negotiating to avert the fiscal cliff, the house will vote on the gop plan b, a bill to keep tax rates in place
the popularity issue is a significant one. i would not ever confuse it with how people feel about us. it is a very different thing. >> in many places, we want friends. i have a three-part question -- what can we do to encourage a resolution or force a resolution to end the conflict? how likely is it we can do this successfully? what are the continued benefits of we succeed? >> i will ask bruce to begin. >> the israeli-palestinian conflict is extraordinarily difficult to sell. i have spent an inordinate amount of my life with israelis and palestinians trying to reason together and cannot claim any measure of success. that said, i think where we are today is substantially different than where we have been in the past. we know the contours' of agreement between israel and palestine. president clinton laid them out 12 years ago. there has been a lot of work since then. the question then becomes, what are we prepared to do to make that happen? that is a question of political will. there are huge obstacles on both sides. the forces of peace in the israeli camp and the palestinian camp have
two deputies testifying. republicans charged and raised questions how the state department is using their money. >> we look at september 10, 2012, the day before the most recent attack against the united states and our people, we see that secretary clinton was engaged in launching a new program called the diplomatic culinary partnership where american chefs will travel the world to engage in culinary diplomacy. certainly this is an example of misplaced priorities. >>reporter: democrats charge the republicans have been behind a push to limit or cut back on the state department funding for the fiscal year 2013. in addition, they charged that the republicans have politicized benghazi and four american lives have been lost in the mix. >> we have taken the train off the tracks. i would be very pleasantly surprised if one of our colleagues, just one, had on his agenda ready to talk about one of the 29 points or recommendations and say, is this particular one good or bad or can we strengthen it? >>reporter: at hearing we also had confirmation that secretary of state, hillary clinton has ag
impression on a great many people around the world, and especially on the 100 of us who serve here. he commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for
was straightforward and determined and he used his talents in the u.s. senate to pass important legislation, including the gramm-rudman deficit law, which was so important at the time. those issues remain important today. he did not aspire to be a politician, and he did not have to like one. he cared deeply. [laughter] we know he cared deeply about our country and devoted himself because he had a calling to shape and preserve our country's future. he believed deeply in the rule of law and used the force of his intellect to defend it. one of the things that is most telling about warren rudman is the statement that represents what he was all about. he once said -- i consider myself an american first and a republican second. fiercely independent, and totally committed to the common good, he had the courage of his convictions and stood for what he believed in. in bidding farewell to the senate in 1992, he expressed gratitude for the opportunity to serve in the senate with talented colleagues. many are here today to speak about their experiences with him. he also expressed his hope for the future of the se
>> for state department officials resigned after reports for lack of security at the u.s. benghazi, libya. wittiest ambassador and three other americans were killed. at 8 a.m. eastern the senate foreign relations committee, we will have that on c-span2. later in the day, we will head over to the house side of the capitol. we have live coverage at 1 p.m. eastern here on c-span3. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every of them appear, probably will never happen again in history. it's interesting because after dad was sworn in we went in and took a picture, photo of the family behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexander virginia, suburbia, munich, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we been living there. dad was vice president. i've never forget that night mom was co
amendments in order and upon the use or yielding back of time on those amendments, the senate proceed to vote in relation to the coburn amendments, with all provisions of the previous order remaining in effect. the presiding officer: no objection? without objection. ms. mikulski: mr. president, simply what this means is this, and i'm really asking for the senators to pay attention on this. so -- because they're very keenly interested in the schedule, and i really want to thank the distinguished senator from mississippi, senator cochran, for working on the expeditious disposition of our amendments. senators should be aware that after 2:00 p.m., they should be in the chamber to vote on these amendments. these are ten-minute votes and we do not intend to hold the votes beyond the time. the leadership on both sides of the aisle will be going to the white house to discuss the really critical, crucial matters before the nation. they must go to the white house but they will want to exercise their vote. so let's cooperate with the leadership. at 2:00, senator coburn will make his debate, we'll have a
. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll nominate? caller: obama. host: what makes him your hero? caller: we were on a major slide when he came into office. he save the automobile and got osama bin laden. he did everything even though the gop
the experience and commitment to go along with you. keep dreaming. keep doing. go long. >> steve: join us for the friday "fox & friends," yesterday we showed that you dancing cop. he'll be in front of the building directing new york city traffic. >> brian: the winner of the x factor will be joining us live. if you have to run from the tv, run to the radio. steve, you'll be joining me, right? >> steve: i will. weather alert. serious trouble for millions of americans hoping to travel for the holiday. check out the storm system. it is powerful. moving through the central part of u.s., upper plains. blizzard and winter storm warnings for nebraska and great lakes. deep south tornado sirens blaring. mobile, alabama, roofs have been ripped off, trees topple. a powerful storm moves through there. a warning in effect in mobile, alabama. i'm bill hemmer. welcome to "america's newsroom". martha: why don't we get normal weather. always something extreme. it is causing delays and cancellations. they're trying to get home. going through chicago o'hare's airport the nation's second busiest airport. they
understands that we have a responsibility to use american power wisely, especially our military power. and he knows, from personal experience, that when we send our troops into harm's way, we must give them the sound strategy, a clear mission, and the resources that they need to get the job done. in an extraordinarily distinguished senate career and as chairman of the foreign relations committee, john has played a central role in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years. as we turn the page on a decade of war, he understands that we've got to harness all elements of american power and ensure that they're working together-- diplomatic and development, economic and political, military and intelligence-- as well as the power of our values which inspire so many people around the world. he is not going to need a lot of on-the-job training. he has earned the respect and trust of his senate colleagues, democrats and republicans. i think it's fair to say that few individuals know as many presidents and prime ministers, or grasp our foreign policies as firmly as john kerry. and this makes
to play the blame game. this is about to put us over the edge. >> perry, i want to start with you. if perception is reality and the blame is going to matter to somebody, which side is it really going to matter to? ivities the blame is on both sides. what's driven this whole process is republicans are very opposed to -- just the republicans who will vote for any tax increase. we learned last week from the plan b vote. once we go over the cliff, republicans are ready for a tax cut, not an increase. right now that's what the big challenge is. >> chip, is that the biggest strategy here, get to the third and pass the third, the new congress comes in, boehner danger doesn't exist anymore, his speakership stays in place and grover norquist gives a thumbs up to up? >> i don't think that was the strategy a week ago. i think the speaker was trying to put the deal together, as we've seen the senate not -- i think that may become the strategy. i've always thought they would wait until the last hour, put a band eight on it, but wait until the iii so they can vote for a tax cut makes sense as w
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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